Description of Figure/Doll

Ceramic troll doll from Norway. Trolls are important in Norwegian culture. They are mythical beings in Norwegian folklore that generally live in caves, under bridges, etc. This female troll is wearing a colorful jumper over a white lace blouse. She has a gold necklace, gold and green belt, and has several decorations on her jumper. Her large feet have pink painted toenails. Her over-sized head has a large nose, large ears, and marble eyeballs. Her hair is long, unkempt and stringy.

Norway

Location: Europe: Scandinavia

Capital: Oslo

Main language: Norwegian

Currency: Norwegian Krone

Figure/Doll

Construction: resin, with synthetic hair

Height in Centimeters: 8

Height in Inches: 3

The Troll and Three Billy Goats Gruff

Reading Level: 2.40

Far to the north, there is a long and narrow country called Norway. Dark forests, moonlit lakes, deep fjords, and mighty snow-capped mountains make the country beautiful and mysterious. I say mysterious because all over Norway live strange and interesting people called Trolls. There are many types of trolls; some are very big and some are very small, but they all have certain characteristics.

All trolls have big ears and long noses, and bushy tails. Trolls are night creatures. They do not like the sunlight. They can live much longer than humans. Another super-human feat is that they can make themselves invisible. There are many legends in Norway about the trolls, but the most famous is Three Billy Goats Gruff. This is how it goes.

Once upon a time there were three billy goats, names Gruff. They were on their way to eat on the hillside, but they had to cross a bridge. Under the bridge lived a troll, with eyes as big as saucers, and a nose as long as a poker.

The first goat over the bridge was the youngest Billy Goat Gruff. “Trip, trap, trip, trap!” he walked across the bridge.

“Who’s that tripping over my bridge?” roared the troll.

“I am the smallest Billy Goat Gruff, and I’m going up to the hillside to make myself fat,” said the billy goat, with a tiny voice.

“I’m coming to gobble you up,” said the troll.

“Oh, no! please don’t eat me. I’m too little!” said the billy goat. “Wait for the second Billy Goat Gruff. He’s much bigger.”

“Well, be off with you,” said the troll.

A little while later, the second Billy Goat Gruff crossed the bridge. “Trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap” went the bridge.

“Who’s that tripping over my bridge?” roared the troll.

“I am the second Billy Goat Gruff, and I’m going up to the hillside to make myself fat,” said the billy goat, with a medium voice.

“I’m coming to gobble you up,” said the troll.

“Oh, no! Don’t eat me. Wait for the last Billy Goat Gruff. He’s much bigger.”

“Very well! Be off with you,” said the troll.

Next, the big Billy Goat Gruff crossed the bridge. “Trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap!” went the bridge. This billy goat was heavy and the bridge creaked and groaned under him.

“Who’s that tramping over my bridge?” roared the troll.

“I am the big Billy Goat Gruff ,” said the billy goat, with a big ugly voice.

“I ‘m coming to gobble you up,” roared the troll.

“No, you’re not!” said the biggest Billy Goat Gruff. “I am bigger than you and I could crush you into bits and bones.”

And when the troll saw how big the billy goat was, the troll let him pass. After that, the three billy goats went to the hillside. They got so fat they could hardly walk home. And if the fat hasn’t fallen off, they’re still fat; and so,

Snip, snap, snout. This tale’s told out.

From Project Gutenberg


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